Woman Says Sad Farewell To Her Pet Bird After Paying £50,000 For Its Cancer Treatment

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A woman who spent more than £50,000 on chemotherapy treatment for her pet parrot has said a tearful to the bird after it lost its battle against cancer.Areba, a Wagler’s Conure, underwent chemotherapy for almost a year but the 42-year-old bird passed away on Tuesday evening at Tampa’s Florida Veterinary Specialists.

Cared for round the clock by Dr Teresa Lightfoot and her team at the Avian and Exotic animal ward, Areba had been battling a form of skin cancer since October of 2008. She was diagnosed in February last year after her owner, Anne Lowery, noticed a strange lesion on her beak.Areba then braved weekly chemo and became a firm favourite among staff at the world-renowned animal hospital.A companion of 30 years to Lowery, Areba’s treatment costs were of no consequence to her caring owner.

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Pet's Death 'Like Losing A Parent'

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To those who have never owned a cat or dog, it might seem impossible to understand.Yet a majority of pet owners admit to finding the loss of their four-legged companion just as traumatic as the death of a beloved relative.Half of owners say it is an event equally as heartbreaking as losing a close family member such as an aunt, uncle or grandparent.And a third go even further, comparing it to the death of a parent, sibling or spouse.

The findings come from a survey of 1,300 British dog and cat lovers.It found that they tend to go on mourning departed pets for years, with 53 per cent saying their grief for their cat or dog ‘never goes away’.More than a quarter of all owners also said that they were so grief-stricken by the death of their pet that they were forced to call in sick to work. On average, bereaved owners cost the UK economy £895million last year in days off work, the survey said.

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Pet's Death 'Like Losing A Parent'

human_animal1

To those who have never owned a cat or dog, it might seem impossible to understand.Yet a majority of pet owners admit to finding the loss of their four-legged companion just as traumatic as the death of a beloved relative.Half of owners say it is an event equally as heartbreaking as losing a close family member such as an aunt, uncle or grandparent.And a third go even further, comparing it to the death of a parent, sibling or spouse.

The findings come from a survey of 1,300 British dog and cat lovers.It found that they tend to go on mourning departed pets for years, with 53 per cent saying their grief for their cat or dog ‘never goes away’.More than a quarter of all owners also said that they were so grief-stricken by the death of their pet that they were forced to call in sick to work. On average, bereaved owners cost the UK economy £895million last year in days off work, the survey said.

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Honey Bees With Built-In Central Heating

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Scientists have long attributed the success of the honey bee to the division of labour within the hive.But thermal imaging research for a TV series has identified a previously unknown skill performed by a specialist bee that is vital for a colony’s survival.’Heater bees’ use their bodies to provide a ‘central heating’ system, it has emerged.The ‘heaters’ are responsible for maintaining the temperature in the hive where young bees, known as pupae, are sealed into wax cells while they grow into adult bees.
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