A Six-Legged Deer Discovered

six-legged-dear

A mutant, six-legged deer was discovered in Everett Springs, Georgia in the US after being viciously attacked by two dogs. The little one has two distinct pelvises and uses one leg from each to walk. It also had two tails but lost one following the attack of the dogs.

The veterinarian treating it said the deer’s case is truly abnormal: the legs are part of a twin that didn’t form all the way. It seems to move pretty well, considering the two central legs almost always get in the way. The owners of the dogs said they realized the mutation right after they separated the dogs from the deer and wanted to release it.

Nonetheless, the little one can barely survive in the wilderness on its own. According to the veterinarian, it will be taken at the deer facility at the University of Georgia once it has recovered. Here is a video of fawn trying to run around.

(source)

World's Smallest Deer Gives Birth

wolrds smallest dear 2

Earlier this month, the world’s smallest deer, a Southern pudu, gave birth at Belfast Zoo. Baby Caju is 3 weeks old and is the first Chilean pudu birth for Belfast Zoo and the first captive birth of the species in Ireland.

The world’s smallest deer, a Southern pudu, has given birth in Belfast Zoo. Baby Caju is 3 weeks old and is the first Chilean pudu birth for Belfast Zoo and the first captive birth in Ireland.

Zoo Keeper, Raymond Robinson is delighted at the safe arrival. “Caju is a great addition to the zoo. Our male pudu arrived in 2004 and our female arrived in 2008, and it’s great to have a baby already. He is very small and can be difficult to spot but is having great fun running around his enclosure. ”

The main threat to the southern pudu is destruction of its temperate forest habitat for cattle ranching and logging. Habitat loss through conversion of forest into open lands poses a big problem to the survival of the southern pudu, as do road accidents and hunting.

Zoo Manager, Mark Challis, said “We are delighted to support the captive population of the pudu helping to conserve a small but unique deer under threat in its natural habitat”.

The southern Pudu is listed on appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), helping protect the southern pudu by banning all international trade of the animal.

The baby pudu will reach its full height by three months, and can be seen in its enclosure with mum and dad and two southern screamers.

(source)

World's Smallest Deer Gives Birth

wolrds smallest dear 2

Earlier this month, the world’s smallest deer, a Southern pudu, gave birth at Belfast Zoo. Baby Caju is 3 weeks old and is the first Chilean pudu birth for Belfast Zoo and the first captive birth of the species in Ireland.

The world’s smallest deer, a Southern pudu, has given birth in Belfast Zoo. Baby Caju is 3 weeks old and is the first Chilean pudu birth for Belfast Zoo and the first captive birth in Ireland.

Zoo Keeper, Raymond Robinson is delighted at the safe arrival. “Caju is a great addition to the zoo. Our male pudu arrived in 2004 and our female arrived in 2008, and it’s great to have a baby already. He is very small and can be difficult to spot but is having great fun running around his enclosure. ”

The main threat to the southern pudu is destruction of its temperate forest habitat for cattle ranching and logging. Habitat loss through conversion of forest into open lands poses a big problem to the survival of the southern pudu, as do road accidents and hunting.

Zoo Manager, Mark Challis, said “We are delighted to support the captive population of the pudu helping to conserve a small but unique deer under threat in its natural habitat”.

The southern Pudu is listed on appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), helping protect the southern pudu by banning all international trade of the animal.

The baby pudu will reach its full height by three months, and can be seen in its enclosure with mum and dad and two southern screamers.

(source)

Rare Albino White-Tailed Deer Spotted In West Virginia

albinodeer

Village resident Jeannie Bourne got a long-awaited photo last week when she snapped a picture of what she believes is a true albino deer in her backyard.

Jim Crum, wildlife biologist for the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources, said true albinism is “uncommon” among deer – about one in every 100,000. Albinism, which affects nearly every species of animal, including humans, is characterized by a lack of pigment, said Gary Sharp of the WVDNR.

The local deer’s antlers and coat are completely white, and only its nose, the inside of its ears and eyes are pink. Crum said pink eyes are a good indicator of true albinism.

Bourne said she’s spotted the snow white animal several times in recent months, and kept a camera in her kitchen in hopes of capturing an image of the deer. Last week, she and her husband Chuck were finishing dinner when they glimpsed it drinking from a pond on their property.
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