Japan Sends Rare Turtles To Singapore For Release

Thirteen endangered sea turtles bred in captivity in Japan have been given to a Singapore aquarium to prepare them for release into a natural habitat later this year, scientists said Friday.The hawksbill turtles, listed as a highly endangered species, were brought to Singapore by their Japanese caretakers Tomomi Saito and Yoshihiko Kanou from the Port of Nagoya Public Aquarium.

The five one-year-old turtles and eight three-year-olds were turned over on Thursday to the Underwater World Singapore, which is collaborating with the Nagoya aquarium to release the animals.They are the offspring of hawksbill turtles donated by the Underwater World Singapore to the Nagoya aquarium in 1997 and 2002.

As part of the preparations, staff from the Singapore aquarium will monitor and conduct checks on the turtles to determine their fitness for the release scheduled in September.”With the success of their breeding… we would want to have some of these captive-bred turtles return to the wild,” said Anthony Chang, curator of the Underwater World Singapore.
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Asian Bear Filmed Doing 'Kung Fu' Moves With Stick

Footage has emerged of an Asian black bear allegedly doing ‘Kung Fu’ style moves with a stick. The footage, which was uploaded to YouTube a few days ago, shows the bear first playing with the 5ft stick with a paw.The bear then appears to start twirling the stick rapidly around its head using ‘Kung Fu’ style moves. At one point the bear – allegedly named Cloud – even throws the stick mid-twirl into the air and catches it.

The three-minute clip of the bear was filmed by Canadian YouTube user alexbuzzkentaroguy at the Asa Zoo in Hiroshima, Japan. He says he then uploaded the clip to YouTube.Animal behaviour expert Professor Marc Bekoff from the University of Colorado said the footage appears genuine.
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Study Gives Scientists A Sense Of How Animals Bond

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Scientists have pinpointed how a key hormone helps animals to recognise others by their smell.Researchers at the University of Edinburgh have shown that the hormone vasopressin helps the brain differentiate between familiar and new scents.The study, published in the journal Nature, suggests that when the hormone fails to function, animals are unable to recognise other individuals from their scent.

The ability to recognise others by smell is crucial in helping animals to establish strong bonds with other animals.The research, funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), may offer clues about the way people make emotional connections with others through smell and deepen our understanding of the role scent plays in memory.Many scientists think a failure in this recognition system in humans may prevent them from forming deep emotional bonds with others.
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Oscar Clears Way For 'Cove' In Japan

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An Oscar win by “The Cove,” a documentary chronicling bloody dolphin hunting in a Japanese fishing town, could give the film the critical audience its makers wanted to reach: ordinary moviegoers in Japan.

News that the movie won the Academy Award for best feature documentary was greeted with surprise in Japan because many Japanese hadn’t heard of it. The U.S. film, directed by former National Geographic photographer Louie Psihoyos, hasn’t been shown in commercial theaters in Japan except for a single viewing during the Tokyo International Film Festival in October.

(source)

(source)

Oscar Clears Way For 'Cove' In Japan

the-cove1

An Oscar win by “The Cove,” a documentary chronicling bloody dolphin hunting in a Japanese fishing town, could give the film the critical audience its makers wanted to reach: ordinary moviegoers in Japan.

News that the movie won the Academy Award for best feature documentary was greeted with surprise in Japan because many Japanese hadn’t heard of it. The U.S. film, directed by former National Geographic photographer Louie Psihoyos, hasn’t been shown in commercial theaters in Japan except for a single viewing during the Tokyo International Film Festival in October.

(source)

(source)

Biggest Crab Ever Seen In Britain… And It's Still Growing

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With its enormous legs and lethal claws, this monster of the deep is already the biggest crab ever seen in Britain.But astonishingly, the arthropod – which measures a staggering 10ft from claw to claw – is still growing, and could live until it is 100.Nicknamed ‘Crabzilla’ after the fictional giant monster, the Japanese Spider Crab has a body the size of a basketball and its legs can straddle a car. They will eventually measure a massive 15ft.

The crab, called Macrocheira kaempferi in Latin, was caught by fishermen in the Pacific Ocean and has now been imported to Britain where it has gone on display at the National Sea Life Centre in Birmingham.Out of the water, the crab looks limp and languid because it cannot support its heavy limbs.But in its own habitat – up to 2,500ft down in the cold seas of the ocean – it is a lethal predator.However, it also has predators of its own – humans – as it is considered a delicacy in Japan.Graham Burrows, curator of the National Sea Life Centre in Birmingham, said: ‘It is rumoured these crabs can grow to four metres across.’Our open-topped ray tank has the icy cold waters Crabzilla needs, and will be his home until the end of March.
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Biggest Crab Ever Seen In Britain… And It's Still Growing

article-0-083D8146000005DC-472_468x700

With its enormous legs and lethal claws, this monster of the deep is already the biggest crab ever seen in Britain.But astonishingly, the arthropod – which measures a staggering 10ft from claw to claw – is still growing, and could live until it is 100.Nicknamed ‘Crabzilla’ after the fictional giant monster, the Japanese Spider Crab has a body the size of a basketball and its legs can straddle a car. They will eventually measure a massive 15ft.

The crab, called Macrocheira kaempferi in Latin, was caught by fishermen in the Pacific Ocean and has now been imported to Britain where it has gone on display at the National Sea Life Centre in Birmingham.Out of the water, the crab looks limp and languid because it cannot support its heavy limbs.But in its own habitat – up to 2,500ft down in the cold seas of the ocean – it is a lethal predator.However, it also has predators of its own – humans – as it is considered a delicacy in Japan.Graham Burrows, curator of the National Sea Life Centre in Birmingham, said: ‘It is rumoured these crabs can grow to four metres across.’Our open-topped ray tank has the icy cold waters Crabzilla needs, and will be his home until the end of March.
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