Jorge Garcia's Chihuahua Nunu Dies

With the end of Lost comes another end for actor Jorge Garcia: the loss of his precious Chihuahua Nunu.Garcia, who played Hugo/Hurley on the series, posted to his blog, Dispatches from the Island, to announce the sad news on Monday.

“It breaks my heart to tell you that yesterday as we were preparing to all go to the airport Nunu was struck by a car as she crossed the street,” Garcia wrote. “She died in my arms.”Garcia, who was not available for comment, chronicled Nunu’s adventures frequently on the blog, posting photos of his black-and-brown “chiweenie” chewing on toys, sheets, and sometimes even Garcia’s nose. Garcia wrote that in 2005, he had been thinking about rescuing a dog from a Hawaii Humane Society, but a stop at a local pet shop brought about a change of plans. It seems his heart couldn’t resist little Nunu.
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Saga Of Animal Control Officer Who Gave Away Lost Dog Ends Happily For Pet Owner

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An animal control officer in Stoughton, Mass. found a woman’s lost dog — only to give it away as a gift.
As reported by the Brockton Enterprise, an animal control officer, Kristin Bousquet, was fired after an internal investigation and hearing revealed that she had found a lost dog belonging to Janet Torren, and inexplicably gave it away to a police officer and his girlfriend to keep as a pet, all the while telling Torren that she had not found the dog, a four year-old Yorkshire Terrier named Shai, who went missing on September 18.

“Shai is like my child,” says Torren, 59. “How could [Bousquet] think that I didn’t love my pet enough to go all out to try to get her back?” Speaking with Paw Nation, Torren recounted the story of the efforts she made to find Shai — and just in the nick of time. When Torren finally was reunited with Shai on October 1, the dog was en route to the airport with her new owners, who were moving to Florida.
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Lost Cat Travels 300 Miles On Coach

LOST 15 MONTH CAT

An intrepid cat called Geoffrey travelled over 300 miles in the luggage compartment of a coach from his Isle of Wight home to the Yorkshire resort of Whitby before being foundThe fifteen-month-old bengal has been known to go off for a night or two but when he disappeared for three weeks his owners thought they may never see him again – until he turned up in North Yorkshire.

Cat lovers Cindy and Tim Whitbread could not believe it when they got a telephone call on Monday to say their pet was alive and well despite his ten-hour journey by road.Nurse Cindy, who has had Geoffrey from being a kitten, said: “Geoffrey cannot even stand being in the car for two minutes, if he has to go to the vet he starts wailing when the car starts moving. I can’t believe he’s travelled that far. He must have been beside himself.

“I’m surprised nobody heard him.”The only explanation for Geoffrey’s jaunt is that he must have hopped into the luggage compartment of one of the many coaches that pull up at nearby hotels and B&Bs in the tourist destination.He has then made an hour long journey to get to the ferry port, travelled for an hour over the English Channel and then headed up on the slow coach ride to the North of England.
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40 New Species In 'Lost World'

Wildlife cameraman Gordon Buchanan with the Bosavi Woolly Rat

Wildlife cameraman Gordon Buchanan with the Bosavi Woolly Rat

Rats as big as cats, fanged frogs and grunting fish – they sound like something from a horror movie.But, incredibly, there is a ‘lost world’ on a distant island where these nightmarish creatures really exist.A team of scientists discovered the bizarre animals – and dozens of others – at a remote volcano in Papua New Guinea.
In the kilometre-deep crater of Mount Bosavi, they found a habitat teeming with life which has evolved in isolation since the volcano last erupted 200,000 years ago.

A new species of frog found near base camp. When scared it puffs up its body.

A new species of frog found near base camp. When scared it puffs up its body.

Among the new species was the the Bosavi Woolly Rat.One of the biggest rats in the world, it measures just over 32 inches from nose to tail and weighs 3lb.The silvery grey mammal has dense fur and its teeth suggest it has a largely vegetarian diet and probably builds nests in tree hollows or underground.

A frog named, Litoria sauroni, discovered on the trip

A frog named, Litoria sauroni, discovered on the trip

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40 New Species In 'Lost World'

Wildlife cameraman Gordon Buchanan with the Bosavi Woolly Rat

Wildlife cameraman Gordon Buchanan with the Bosavi Woolly Rat

Rats as big as cats, fanged frogs and grunting fish – they sound like something from a horror movie.But, incredibly, there is a ‘lost world’ on a distant island where these nightmarish creatures really exist.A team of scientists discovered the bizarre animals – and dozens of others – at a remote volcano in Papua New Guinea.
In the kilometre-deep crater of Mount Bosavi, they found a habitat teeming with life which has evolved in isolation since the volcano last erupted 200,000 years ago.

A new species of frog found near base camp. When scared it puffs up its body.

A new species of frog found near base camp. When scared it puffs up its body.

Among the new species was the the Bosavi Woolly Rat.One of the biggest rats in the world, it measures just over 32 inches from nose to tail and weighs 3lb.The silvery grey mammal has dense fur and its teeth suggest it has a largely vegetarian diet and probably builds nests in tree hollows or underground.

A frog named, Litoria sauroni, discovered on the trip

A frog named, Litoria sauroni, discovered on the trip

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Lost Cat? Hire A Cat-Detection Dog

lost- cat -rescue

Got a dog who’s nuts for cats? You might want to train him to put his feline obsession to good use.

The Seattle-area-based Missing Pet Partnership (MPP) trains dogs, and their owners, to be first-rate detectives, sniffing out lost pets. When it comes to cat-detection, “we pick dogs that naturally get hyper-excited and wiggly when they detect the scent of a cat,” MPP founder Kat Albrecht tells Paw Nation.

Albrecht, who began her career as a police officer working with search-and-rescue bloodhounds, would use her own search dog to track lost pets in her spare time. Eventually her side project grew into the Missing Pet Partnership.

Not every cat lovin’ dog is up to par though. Only one in 15 dogs passes the initial test, which determines whether a dog can stay in the cat zone despite distractions like food and other pups. Dogs that pass this test enter a training program that typically lasts three or four months, Albrecht says. After they graduate, the dogs are ready to help locate runaway cats. Most graduates — and their owners — go on to provide their detecting services to their communities.

“Cat-detection dogs are a tool that we take with us when we go yard to yard looking under and in every hiding place for a cat. If there’s cat scent, the dog will let us know,” Albrecht tells Paw Nation.
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