Now Dog's To Keep An Eye On Poachers

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In a bid to curb hunting of declining wild cats, forest officials are now mulling to use the services of dogs to keep a watch on the poachers.Four dogs are being trained here to keep a watch on the poachers in Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra and Jharkhand.

“We are training four dogs – all German Shepard’s – for the forest departments of Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra and Jharkhand, to check poaching of animals, especially tigers,” Madhya Pradesh Special Armed Force (SAF) 23nd Battalion’s Dog Training Academy deputy superintendent of police (DSP) B B Rai said.Traffic India of World Wildlife Fund (WWF) was bearing the expenditure of dog training, and had bought the canines for different forest departments, Rai said.

After training, two dogs will be handed over to the MP forest department and one each will be deployed in Maharashtra and Jharkhand, he said.According to Rai, the canines have completed the first part of their training – obedience – and now they will be imparted skills of nose work and trekking to track down the poachers.
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Now Dog's To Keep An Eye On Poachers

gsd3680

In a bid to curb hunting of declining wild cats, forest officials are now mulling to use the services of dogs to keep a watch on the poachers.Four dogs are being trained here to keep a watch on the poachers in Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra and Jharkhand.

“We are training four dogs – all German Shepard’s – for the forest departments of Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra and Jharkhand, to check poaching of animals, especially tigers,” Madhya Pradesh Special Armed Force (SAF) 23nd Battalion’s Dog Training Academy deputy superintendent of police (DSP) B B Rai said.Traffic India of World Wildlife Fund (WWF) was bearing the expenditure of dog training, and had bought the canines for different forest departments, Rai said.

After training, two dogs will be handed over to the MP forest department and one each will be deployed in Maharashtra and Jharkhand, he said.According to Rai, the canines have completed the first part of their training – obedience – and now they will be imparted skills of nose work and trekking to track down the poachers.
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Tigers' Bodies Are Plundered To Make £185 Wine !!

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Behind rusted bars, a skeletal male tiger lies panting on the filthy concrete floor of his cage, covered in sores and untreated wounds. His once-fearsome body is so emaciated it is little more than a pitiful pile of fur and bones.Death is surely a matter of days away and can only come as a welcome release. Wardens at the wildlife park in southwest China say, indifferently, that they do not expect him to see the start of the Year of the Tiger which began last Sunday.

‘What can we do?’ a female park official asks a small huddle of visitors with a sigh and a casual shrug. ‘He’s dying, of course, but we have to keep feeding him until he does. It’s against the law to kill tigers.’Instead, it seems, they die slowly of neglect. In row after row of foul, cramped cages, more tigers lie alone, crippled and dying. One is hunched up against the side of its cage with its neck grotesquely deformed. Another, blinded in one eye, lies motionless.

This shabby, rundown park in Guilin – one of China’s main tourist cities – is home to the world’s biggest single collection of tigers. Yet it is never included on foreigners’ tour itineraries.For here, 1,500 captive tigers – around half as many as there are thought to be remaining in the wild – live out miserable lives in squalid conditions.Each tiger costs around £6 a day to feed, and it is easy to see that the small clusters of visitors paying £7.50 each to wander around the cages and watch bizarre animal shows cannot possibly cover even the cost of food for the vast park.

article-1252500-08357236000005DC-839_634x449
More

Tigers' Bodies Are Plundered To Make £185 Wine !!

article-1252500-083577F1000005DC-706_634x418

Behind rusted bars, a skeletal male tiger lies panting on the filthy concrete floor of his cage, covered in sores and untreated wounds. His once-fearsome body is so emaciated it is little more than a pitiful pile of fur and bones.Death is surely a matter of days away and can only come as a welcome release. Wardens at the wildlife park in southwest China say, indifferently, that they do not expect him to see the start of the Year of the Tiger which began last Sunday.

‘What can we do?’ a female park official asks a small huddle of visitors with a sigh and a casual shrug. ‘He’s dying, of course, but we have to keep feeding him until he does. It’s against the law to kill tigers.’Instead, it seems, they die slowly of neglect. In row after row of foul, cramped cages, more tigers lie alone, crippled and dying. One is hunched up against the side of its cage with its neck grotesquely deformed. Another, blinded in one eye, lies motionless.

This shabby, rundown park in Guilin – one of China’s main tourist cities – is home to the world’s biggest single collection of tigers. Yet it is never included on foreigners’ tour itineraries.For here, 1,500 captive tigers – around half as many as there are thought to be remaining in the wild – live out miserable lives in squalid conditions.Each tiger costs around £6 a day to feed, and it is easy to see that the small clusters of visitors paying £7.50 each to wander around the cages and watch bizarre animal shows cannot possibly cover even the cost of food for the vast park.

article-1252500-08357236000005DC-839_634x449
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