Pesticide Turns Male Frogs Into Females

frogs

A commonly used pesticide known as atrazine can turn male frogs into females that are successfully able to reproduce, a new study finds.While previous work has shown atrazine can cause sexual abnormalities in frogs, such as hermaphroditism (having both male and female sex organs), this study is the first to find that atrazine’s effects are long-lasting and can influence reproduction in amphibians.

The results suggest that atrazine, which is a weed killer used primarily on corn crops, could have potentially harmful effects on populations of amphibians, animals that are already experiencing a global decline, said study author Tyrone B. Hayes of the University of California, Berkeley. Atrazine is banned in Europe.And since atrazine interferes with the production of the sex hormone estrogen, present in people and frogs, the findings could have implications for humans as well. “If you have problems in amphibians, you can anticipate problems in other animals,” Hayes said.
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70 Year Old Tortoise Entertains Zoo Visitors With Sexual Behaviour

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An amorous tortoise aged 70 has been entertaining visitors at a zoo thanks to his public displays of affection ‘Dirty Dirk’, the Galapagos tortoise, who weighs 31 stone, has been paying particular attention to Dolly, 14, and Dolores, 10.Sebastian Grant, Giant Tortoise keeper at London Zoo, said: “He’s called Dirk because he was so amorous from the moment he got here – literally minutes. “We named him after Dirk Diggler of Boogie Nights. He’s earned his name, and he’s quite willing to go as long as the girls will let him.”
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Turns Out Mary The Tortoise Is Actually A Male

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Three Aldabra tortoises have lived at the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo for the past 50 years. Their names are Tom, Tim and Mary — well, in Mary’s case, was. During a spontaneous physical exam in early November, Mary, whose short tail, domed upper shell and small size had led zoo staff to believe she was a female, showed an internal reproductive organ that “left no question of his manhood,” according to the zoo’s blog. Turned out that Mary the female Aldabra tortoise is a guy.

“Obviously, we were very surprised by this,” Jeff Hall, the zoo’s general curator, tells Ezquara.com. “But stranger things have happened in the world, so it’s not unbelievable, but it was a surprise.”

Mary’s physical appearance not only appeared to have the sexual characteristics of a female, but Mary also never mounted the other tortoises — or displayed any desire to. Because this tortoise does not usually breed in captivity or in the northern hemisphere, breeding was never a priority for the zoo.
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Vet Shells Out For B&Q Drill To Save Life Of Tiny Tortoise

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Inventive vet Louise Rayment-Dyble showed that you really can ‘do it if you B&Q it’ as she turned to the high street shop to help her carry out an important operation.Twinnie the tortoise is barely the size of a 50p piece, so enterprising Louise chose to use a £100 B&Q drill and dremel cutting bit to cut through her shell.

‘She sliced into the three-year-old spur-thighed tortoise and removed a stone causing a blockage which could have killed Twinnie.Mrs Rayment-Dyble, who runs All Creatures Healthcare in Horsford, near Norwich, bought the special kit at the B&Q store in nearby Hellesdon.

Louise said last night: ‘The owners brought it in last week because it was starving and constipated.
‘We brought it in for an X-ray and there was a huge stone in there.’We could either put the tortoise to sleep to stop her from suffering or we could try and operate.’

She added: ‘When we’re cutting through the bone in the shell we need a high-torque force and needed something quite powerful, which is why we went to B&Q.’Unusually Twinnie, who weighs a paper-thin 28g, hatched in the same egg as a twin, hence both her name and her small size.
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Meet the world's rarest tortoise

Science and environment correspondent David Shukman
meets the world’s rarest tortoise – Lonesome George.
This ancient reptile is the last remaining survivor of a subspecies of giant tortoise.

the last one

(source)

Meet the world's rarest tortoise

Science and environment correspondent David Shukman
meets the world’s rarest tortoise – Lonesome George.
This ancient reptile is the last remaining survivor of a subspecies of giant tortoise.

the last one

(source)

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