Beluga Whale Survives Difficult Birth

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The boy beluga whale calf can be seen swimming through its pool and lifting its head above the surface.

The whale’s famous bizarrely human expression makes the occasion all the more striking as the calf appears to smile for the camera. The baby was born breech (head-first), which is rare, as beluga whale calves are generally born tail (fluke) first.Animal care and animal health experts at the Shedd Aquarium have been closely monitoring both the mother, named Puiji, and her baby.

Ken Ramirez, senior vice president of animal collections at the zoo, said both were doing well.He said: “We are thrilled to welcome the newest member of the Shedd beluga family.”However, a newborn calf must reach several milestones in its first days and months, so we remain cautiously optimistic.

“The calf has made tremendous progress over the past 48 hours, including bonding with mum and nursing, which happened for the first time this morning.”We are pleased at what we’ve seen and will continue to provide the very best 24-hour care over the days and months to come.”Because of the breech birth, physicals were carried out last night on both mother and calf. Initial results indicate the calf is in good condition.
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'Barren' Horse's Surprise Birth — To Rare Twins!

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Last year, Yvonne Bartram’s vet told her that two breeding mares on her farm in England were barren, unlikely to ever conceive again. Luckily, he was wrong, twice! Six weeks ago, the 13-year-old mare named Sofie gave birth to twins, and the other, a 19-year-old named Elbe, is expecting for the second time since the diagnosis.

When Bartram, 47, was told her mares were barren, she thought she might sell Sofie as a riding horse —the mare had been an international show jumper before she began breeding. But one day, Bartram’s farrior pointed out that the horse “looked a bit heavy.” A different vet performed a scan and confirmed that the mare was seven months in foal.

Sofie was due in September, and Bartram and her staff took bets on when the foal would turn up, and whether it would be a filly or a colt. October came, and Sofie still hadn’t gone into labor.

“We’d given up on the sweepstakes,” Bartram tells Ezquara,when on a cold, October night, “she finally laid down to start foaling. I thought, ‘Hell, for the size of the mare, that’s not a very big foal.’ And then, another pair of feet!”
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'Barren' Horse's Surprise Birth — To Rare Twins!

twins

Last year, Yvonne Bartram’s vet told her that two breeding mares on her farm in England were barren, unlikely to ever conceive again. Luckily, he was wrong, twice! Six weeks ago, the 13-year-old mare named Sofie gave birth to twins, and the other, a 19-year-old named Elbe, is expecting for the second time since the diagnosis.

When Bartram, 47, was told her mares were barren, she thought she might sell Sofie as a riding horse —the mare had been an international show jumper before she began breeding. But one day, Bartram’s farrior pointed out that the horse “looked a bit heavy.” A different vet performed a scan and confirmed that the mare was seven months in foal.

Sofie was due in September, and Bartram and her staff took bets on when the foal would turn up, and whether it would be a filly or a colt. October came, and Sofie still hadn’t gone into labor.

“We’d given up on the sweepstakes,” Bartram tells Ezquara,when on a cold, October night, “she finally laid down to start foaling. I thought, ‘Hell, for the size of the mare, that’s not a very big foal.’ And then, another pair of feet!”
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The Feisty Vancouver Island Marmot

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The feisty Vancouver Island Marmot is Canada’s most endangered mammal with only an estimated 30 living in the wild in 2003. However, institutions like the Calgary and Toronto Zoos launched aggressive breeding and release programs that have since bolstered the wild population to 200 or more. These pups were born at the Calgary Zoo on June 30th and the Toronto Zoo just welcomed a litter this week!

16 VANCOUVER ISLAND PUPS BORN AT THE CALGARY ZOO
Canada’s Most Endangered Mammal and a 2010 Olympic Mascot – Making a Comeback Calgary, AB –When a species comes to the brink of extinction, it takes the dedicated and combined effort of many individuals and institutions to rescue it.

In total, 65 Vancouver Island marmot pups were born this year at four
partnering facilities across Canada including the Calgary Zoo, the Toronto Zoo,Mountain View Conservation & Breeding Centre in Langley, B.C. and the Tony Barrett Mt. Washington Recovery Centre on Vancouver Island.

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Shark Midwife Gives Toothy C-Section

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There’s another Octomom making headlines — but this time, she’s got serious teeth. Visitors to Kelly Tarlton’s Underwater World aquarium in New Zealand got a shock when they saw one shark attack another — and baby sharks swimming out of the gash left in her side.The mother, a school shark, was brought to the aquarium after she was snared by fishermen, and aquarium staff had no idea she was pregnant, according to a press release issued by Underwater World.

When a broadnose sevengill shark took out some “normal seasonal aggression” on the expectant mother, it left a gouge big enough for the babies to swim free. Four tiny pups swam immediately out of the wound in their mom’s side. When staff treated the injured shark, they found four more babies alive inside.

“Ironically the fight their mother got into probably saved these pups’ lives! Had she given birth naturally, mostly likely at night, we probably wouldn’t have gotten to the pups in time to move them to a safe, predator-free area,” the aquarium’s curator, marine biologist Andrew Christie, said in a press release.
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Dramatic Elephant Birth

Behold this graphic but compelling footage of the first ever elephant birth filmed in Bali, Indonesia.

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World's Smallest Deer Gives Birth

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Earlier this month, the world’s smallest deer, a Southern pudu, gave birth at Belfast Zoo. Baby Caju is 3 weeks old and is the first Chilean pudu birth for Belfast Zoo and the first captive birth of the species in Ireland.

The world’s smallest deer, a Southern pudu, has given birth in Belfast Zoo. Baby Caju is 3 weeks old and is the first Chilean pudu birth for Belfast Zoo and the first captive birth in Ireland.

Zoo Keeper, Raymond Robinson is delighted at the safe arrival. “Caju is a great addition to the zoo. Our male pudu arrived in 2004 and our female arrived in 2008, and it’s great to have a baby already. He is very small and can be difficult to spot but is having great fun running around his enclosure. ”

The main threat to the southern pudu is destruction of its temperate forest habitat for cattle ranching and logging. Habitat loss through conversion of forest into open lands poses a big problem to the survival of the southern pudu, as do road accidents and hunting.

Zoo Manager, Mark Challis, said “We are delighted to support the captive population of the pudu helping to conserve a small but unique deer under threat in its natural habitat”.

The southern Pudu is listed on appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), helping protect the southern pudu by banning all international trade of the animal.

The baby pudu will reach its full height by three months, and can be seen in its enclosure with mum and dad and two southern screamers.

(source)

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