Not Just China US Under Fire For Tiger Trade

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Conservationists appealed Wednesday for an end to the commercial tiger trade, warning that demand in China, Southeast Asia — but also the United States — was threatening the big cats with extinction.Environmental campaigners see 2010 as crucial to spread their message as East Asian nations celebrate the Year of the Tiger and Russia prepares to hold a summit on tiger conservation in September in Vladivostok.

Only some 3,200 tigers remain in the wild, nearly half of them in India, down from 100,000 worldwide a century ago due to burgeoning human populations and a demand in China, Vietnam and Laos for tiger parts in folk medicine.But environmental campaigners said the problem was not just in Asia. They worried about the United States, where more than 5,000 tigers are believed to be in private hands as backyard pets or roadside zoo attractions.
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Perth's Newest Primate: "Don't Palm Us Off!"

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Perth’s is calling on the community to take action in a campaign to mandate the labelling of palm oil on all food products. The call-to-action came today as a four-week-old critically endangered Sumatran Orangutan, made her debut. The as-yet-unnamed female orangutan was born at 10:40am on 20 October to 39-year-old mother, Puteri. The infant weighed just under 2 kg at birth.The mother and her newborn were given some private time together before being introduced to the public.

Perth Zoo Exotics Curator Leif Cocks said Puteri and the infant are doing extremely well.“Puteri adores the baby, cradling and feeding her when she is hungry or appears to need reassurance,” Mr Cocks said.
“The baby is now hanging onto Puteri without assistance and is strong and alert.”Perth Zoo is a world leader in breeding Sumatran Orangutans and has bred 27 Sumatran Orangutans since 1970. Mother Puteri was the first of the 27 orangutans born at the Zoo.

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More

Perth's Newest Primate: "Don't Palm Us Off!"

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Perth’s is calling on the community to take action in a campaign to mandate the labelling of palm oil on all food products. The call-to-action came today as a four-week-old critically endangered Sumatran Orangutan, made her debut. The as-yet-unnamed female orangutan was born at 10:40am on 20 October to 39-year-old mother, Puteri. The infant weighed just under 2 kg at birth.The mother and her newborn were given some private time together before being introduced to the public.

Perth Zoo Exotics Curator Leif Cocks said Puteri and the infant are doing extremely well.“Puteri adores the baby, cradling and feeding her when she is hungry or appears to need reassurance,” Mr Cocks said.
“The baby is now hanging onto Puteri without assistance and is strong and alert.”Perth Zoo is a world leader in breeding Sumatran Orangutans and has bred 27 Sumatran Orangutans since 1970. Mother Puteri was the first of the 27 orangutans born at the Zoo.

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A Fluffy Baby Paraguayan Porcupine

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Uruguay’s M’Bopicuá Breeding Station keeps surprising us with births we haven’t seen anywhere else. Here we have a gentle Paraguayan Hairy Dwarf Porcupine. Born with soft fur that turns into hard spines with age, these porcupines live in trees eating fruits and vegetables and dig into ant nests for dessert.

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(source)

121 Breeding Tigers Estimated To Be Found In Nepal

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The first ever overall nation-wide estimate of the tiger population brought a positive ray of hope among conservationists. The figures announced by the Nepal Government’s Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation (DNPWC) shows the presence of 121 (100 194) breeding tigers in the wild within the four protected areas of Nepal. The 2008 tiger population estimate was jointly implemented by the DNPWC, Department of Forests (DOF), WWF, National Trust for Nature Conservation (NTNC) with support from Save The Tiger Fund (STF), WWF-US, WWF-UK, WWF International and US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).

The 2008 nation-wide tiger population was initiated on 15 November 2009 in the Terai Arc Landscape (TAL) of Nepal both inside and outside the protected areas of Nepal. (TAL encompasses the Terai region of Nepal and into tiger range states across the border into India.)
“To obtain reliable population estimates of wide ranging species like the tiger, it is important to undertake the survey simultaneously in all potential habitats,” says Dr. Rinjan Shrestha, Conservation Biologist with WWF Nepal. Prior studies had been undertaken in different time periods and at different spatial scales.
“To derive information on both abundance and distribution of tigers, the current survey employed two methods – Camera Trapping method inside the protected areas and Habitat Occupancy survey both inside and outside the protected areas”………

(source)