Animal Hypnotist Is Britain's First 'Rabbit Whisperer'

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An animal hypnotist claims to be the country’s first “rabbit whisperer”, treating pets behavioral problems., Cliff Penrose 60, uses a special technique to put rabbits into a trance – leaving them flat on their backs with their legs in the air.

He is able to hypnotise then animals by applying pressure and massaging certain parts of the body, including the belly which relaxes them. Mr Penrose then ”bows” to the rabbit by lowering his head so it does not feel threatened before shutting its eyelids leaving it in a trance.

He regularly hypnotises rabbits before they go to the vet so they can be treated and examined more easily.But he also treats “problem” rabbits with behavioural issues and can make them less aggressive after putting them in a trance.The grandfather-of-two from St Austell, Cornwall, said the hypnotised rabbits often live longer as a result of being de-stressed.
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The Man With 24 Crocodiles Living At His Semi-Detached Home

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Shaun Foggett is Britain’s answer to Steve Irwin after assembling the largest collection of crocodiles in the country in his back garden. Shaun, 30, keeps 24 crocodiles and alligators in the semi-detached home in Oxford he shares with fiancée Lisa Green, 29, and children Billy, six, Louie, four, and eight-month-old Shania.Joiner Shaun has even erected a purpose-built enclosure for his unique pets which include endangered Black Caymans, Cuban crocodiles and a Chinese alligator to keep the reptiles at a constant 25 degrees.

Shaun has now raised £100,000 in just two years to create Britains first crocodile zoo so his house can be restored to normality.
Shaun is still hunting for a 5,000 sq ft location big enough to house all his prehistoric beasts but in the meantime, his family home retains a tropical feel.”They are amazing animals but not cheap to keep as pets. Just feeding them with rodents and fish costs £8,000 a year,” Shaun said.”I have been interested in crocodiles since I was a little kid and once I started reptiles at 17 it just snowballed.By the time I was 25 I had my dangerous animals licence and I was looking after crocodiles and alligators.

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The Male Tortoiseshell Kitten Who Is Britain's Rarest Cat

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Eddie the cat has defied genetics and odds of 400,000 to one after he was born a MALE tortoiseshell.Vet Karen Horne was stunned to discover the black and ginger tom, who overturns the normal laws of biology.She said she named him after the cross-dressing comic Eddie Izzard because ‘he is essentially a boy dressed in girls’ clothing.

Male cats, like human beings, have only one X chromosome in their DNA meaning it is technically impossible for them to inherit different colours.Of eight million pet cats in Britain only a couple a year are born male tortoiseshells – making Eddie an extremely rare accident.

Karen, 38, said: ‘As a vet I can tell you that it is genetically impossible to get a male cat that is tortoiseshell coloured.

‘My colleagues and I have 30 years of experience between us and we have never seen anything like this.’
The eight-week-old kitten was brought into Karen’s veterinary surgery in Harpenden, Herts, with his three tortoiseshell sisters by local charity Cat and Kitten Rescue.But as Karen set about vaccinating the siblings she discovered to her amazement that one was a boy.
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The Male Tortoiseshell Kitten Who Is Britain's Rarest Cat

unique cat of uk

Eddie the cat has defied genetics and odds of 400,000 to one after he was born a MALE tortoiseshell.Vet Karen Horne was stunned to discover the black and ginger tom, who overturns the normal laws of biology.She said she named him after the cross-dressing comic Eddie Izzard because ‘he is essentially a boy dressed in girls’ clothing.

Male cats, like human beings, have only one X chromosome in their DNA meaning it is technically impossible for them to inherit different colours.Of eight million pet cats in Britain only a couple a year are born male tortoiseshells – making Eddie an extremely rare accident.

Karen, 38, said: ‘As a vet I can tell you that it is genetically impossible to get a male cat that is tortoiseshell coloured.

‘My colleagues and I have 30 years of experience between us and we have never seen anything like this.’
The eight-week-old kitten was brought into Karen’s veterinary surgery in Harpenden, Herts, with his three tortoiseshell sisters by local charity Cat and Kitten Rescue.But as Karen set about vaccinating the siblings she discovered to her amazement that one was a boy.
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