Endangered Crocodiles Hatched In Cambodia

Cambodia – Conservationists in Cambodia are celebrating the hatching of a clutch of eggs from one of the world’s most critically endangered animals, the Siamese crocodile.Thirteen infants crawled out of their shells over the weekend in a remote part of the Cardamom Mountains in southwestern Cambodia, following a weekslong vigil by researchers who found them in the jungle.

Experts believe as few as 250 Siamese crocodiles are left in the wild, almost all of them in Cambodia but with a few spread between Laos, Myanmar, Indonesia, Vietnam and possibly Thailand.The operation to protect and hatch the eggs was mounted by United Kingdom-based Fauna and Flora International, for whom conservation of this once-abundant species is a key program.

“Every nest counts,” program manager Adam Starr told Associated Press Television News. “To be able to find a nest is a very big success story, to be able to hatch eggs properly is an even bigger success story.”The nest, with 22 eggs inside, was discovered in the isolated Areng Valley. Fauna and Flora International volunteers removed 15 of them to a safe site and incubated them in a compost heap to replicate the original nest. They left seven behind because they appeared to be unfertilized.
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The Man With 24 Crocodiles Living At His Semi-Detached Home

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Shaun Foggett is Britain’s answer to Steve Irwin after assembling the largest collection of crocodiles in the country in his back garden. Shaun, 30, keeps 24 crocodiles and alligators in the semi-detached home in Oxford he shares with fiancée Lisa Green, 29, and children Billy, six, Louie, four, and eight-month-old Shania.Joiner Shaun has even erected a purpose-built enclosure for his unique pets which include endangered Black Caymans, Cuban crocodiles and a Chinese alligator to keep the reptiles at a constant 25 degrees.

Shaun has now raised £100,000 in just two years to create Britains first crocodile zoo so his house can be restored to normality.
Shaun is still hunting for a 5,000 sq ft location big enough to house all his prehistoric beasts but in the meantime, his family home retains a tropical feel.”They are amazing animals but not cheap to keep as pets. Just feeding them with rodents and fish costs £8,000 a year,” Shaun said.”I have been interested in crocodiles since I was a little kid and once I started reptiles at 17 it just snowballed.By the time I was 25 I had my dangerous animals licence and I was looking after crocodiles and alligators.

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Crocodiles 'Taught To Recognise Their Names'

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The reptiles, Paleo and Suchus, have been taught to listen for their names being called, it was claimed.Keepers at the centre in Ellesmere Port, Merseyside, they are even learning when to open their mouths for food. They said the type of training had worked with mammals before but hardly ever with reptiles.”They are very intelligent and started responding to their names in just a few days,” said Tom Cornwall, the aquarium’s manager.

In a bid to train them, the crocodiles, which are called Cuvier’s dwarf caiman, are given food as a prize if they react in the right way.The training takes its idea from a similar scheme run at the Madras Crocodile Bank Trust in India.Once fully trained, the aquarium’s zoological team will set up “enrichment activities” for the pair.
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Crocodiles 'Taught To Recognise Their Names'

croc_1564731c

The reptiles, Paleo and Suchus, have been taught to listen for their names being called, it was claimed.Keepers at the centre in Ellesmere Port, Merseyside, they are even learning when to open their mouths for food. They said the type of training had worked with mammals before but hardly ever with reptiles.”They are very intelligent and started responding to their names in just a few days,” said Tom Cornwall, the aquarium’s manager.

In a bid to train them, the crocodiles, which are called Cuvier’s dwarf caiman, are given food as a prize if they react in the right way.The training takes its idea from a similar scheme run at the Madras Crocodile Bank Trust in India.Once fully trained, the aquarium’s zoological team will set up “enrichment activities” for the pair.
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Crocodiles Jump Out Of The Water For Food

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The saltwater crocs were snapped flying high above the Adelaide River in Darwin, Australia, put on the show for amazed tourists, as guides on a sightseeing boat dangled a steak on the end of a stick above their heads.The pictures were taken by tourists during a Jumping Crocs tour, on the Adelaide River in Darwin, Australia. One photographer, Jon Clark, 38, who is originally from Leeds, said: “It’s really an amazing sight.

“People don’t often realise crocodiles can jump like this, but they can propel themselves all the way out of the water if they want to.”It certainly is very impressive to see.”The guides warned everyone to keep their hands well inside the boat, then got out stick with meat attached to the end of them to lure the crocs closer.

“The crocs are wild, but of course they have got used to the boats coming out and know what to do to get food.”The guides dangle the meat close to their heads until they leap up to get it. Then they pull it away quickly to encourage the crocs to jump higher and higher.”When I was there, we saw about 10 or 11 crocs jumping out of the water. If you’re really lucky you might even see the crocs trying to snatch a white-bellied sea eagle out of the air when they come down to grab food.

“It was quite a sight and I’m just glad I managed to catch it on camera.”

(source)