Zimbabwe Plans To Sell Elephants, Jackals, Cats To North Korea

Zimbabwe plans to sell animals including elephants, jackals and wild cats to a zoo in North Korea’s capital, Pyongyang, according to Vitalis Chadenga, director of the African nation’s parks authority.The Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority is also studying applications from Japan, Mozambique and three other unidentified nations to buy species, Chadenga said by phone today from the capital, Harare.

“We don’t just export wildlife without first ascertaining if the conditions they will be held in are safe and we consider that conditions in Pyongyang will be suitable,” he said. Under both domestic and international law, Zimbabwe is allowed to sell wildlife to foreign nations, Chadenga said.Among the animals being sent to North Korea, an impoverished, communist nation, are elephants, giraffes, zebras, jackals, hyenas and civet cats, none of which are endangered in Zimbabwe, Chadenga said.
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India Needs More Parks And Corridors For Long-Term Survival Of Its Animals

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In a new study, an international team of scientists has determined that the long-term survival of many large species in the midst of rapid economic growth in India will require improving existing protected areas and establishing new protected areas and corridors.The study, carried out by researchers at the Wildlife Conservation Society, Duke University, and other groups, found that country’s protected area system and human cultural tolerance for some species are key to conserving the subcontinent’s tigers, elephants, and other large mammals.

The researchers created models to estimate extinction probability for 25 large mammal species, determining current species distributions along with more than 30,000 historical records from natural history, taxidermy and museum records dating back 200 years.The models were used to gauge how factors such as protected areas, forest cover, elevation, and human demographics, and cultural attitudes impact extinction predictions.The results of the analysis found that all 25 species would experience some level of local extinction due to a variety of factors such as habitat loss and human population growth and development.
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Are High Speed Elephants Running Or Walking

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Most animals don’t think anything of breaking into a run: they switch effortlessly from walking to a high-speed bouncing run. But what about elephants? Their sheer size makes it impossible for them to bounce up in the air at high speeds. So how are high-speed elephants moving: are they running or walking?

At a first glance, fast-moving elephants look as if they are walking, according to John Hutchinson from the Royal Veterinary College, UK. But closer analysis of elephant footfall patterns by Hutchinson suggested that speedy elephants’ front legs walk while their hind legs may trot. Norman Heglund from the Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium, realised that the only way to resolve the conundrum was to measure the immense forces exerted on the animals by the ground as they move and found that elephants run in some senses, but not in others.
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Elephants Have A 'Secret Language'

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Elephants have a “secret language” that cannot be heard by human ears, scientists have found. While most are familiar with the elephant’s trumpeting call the animals also emit growls, according to researchers at San Diego Zoo.However, two-thirds of the partly audible call is at frequencies that are too low to be picked up by human ears. To learn more about the inaudible part of the growl, the team attached a microphone sensitive to these low frequencies and a GPS tracking system to eight of the zoo’s female elephants.
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Elephants Have A 'Secret Language'

african-elephants_1581058c

Elephants have a “secret language” that cannot be heard by human ears, scientists have found. While most are familiar with the elephant’s trumpeting call the animals also emit growls, according to researchers at San Diego Zoo.However, two-thirds of the partly audible call is at frequencies that are too low to be picked up by human ears. To learn more about the inaudible part of the growl, the team attached a microphone sensitive to these low frequencies and a GPS tracking system to eight of the zoo’s female elephants.
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Battle Of The Elephants In Thailand

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With lightning speed and military precision, they lock dusks and dodge the lethal spears carried by the warriors on their backs.
These stunning beasts are re-enacting the ancient fighting scenes of their ancestors.The giant bull elephants have been specially trained by their skilled mahouts to fight – but the real battle is in training the elephants to know the difference between a mock clash and a real one.

‘These are war scenes depicting the kings going to battle,’ said Ewa Narkiewicz, from Elephantstay in Thailand.

‘Our elephants are highly trained using special techniques. The idea is to show Thai people what role the elephant played in their history.’Elephants Plai Ngathong and Plai Cocholaat are residents of Elephantstay in Thailand.Here the 25-year-old bulls have undergone years of training to safely recreate mock fight scenes.

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Elephants Trained To Play Basketball

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The Island Safari Centre on Koh Samui is teaching six-year old Malie, and nine-year old Toktak to use their trunks to perform basketball skills, in an effort to improve their health and vitality.Organisers at the centre, which cares for the animals, say that they undergo rigorous training in order to learn the basics of the game. “It takes two or three months of intensive training to teach them basics, but fortunately their standards are improving with each passing day”, said organiser Ning.

The keepers begin by teaching the elephants basic ball control skills, and how to hold the ball in their trunk. The animals are then taught to stand on their hind legs, walk with the ball and finally shoot it through the hoop.Visitors to the centre described the game as “unbelievable”, with one onlooker saying, “I had never seen an elephant playing basketball.”

(source)

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