Bunny's Custom Wheelchair Has Her Back On Her Feet

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Just like any other bunny, 9-year-old Bebe has a good appetite and chows down on Timothy grass, carrots, apples, broccoli, romaine lettuce and bananas. But there’s one thing that sets her apart from your average hopper: because of a rare condition that rendered her immobile, she runs around Kathy and Charles Harris’s Louisiana house in a custom made wheelchair.”I know she is in no pain and seems quite comfortable in the cart,” says Kathy, who lives with her husband in rural Ponchatoula. “Her ears come up, and I see the stress on her legs is gone.”

Bebe easily hopped through life for most of her younger years. Adopted by the Harris’s about a year after they retired, Charles surprised Kathy with the 6-week-old pet that he bought at a local pet shop. They named her Bebe, and she quickly fit in with the couple who have no children and lived on a two-acre property surrounded by bucolic wooded areas.”We both fell in love with her,” Kathy.”She would run all over our lawn and have a ball then come back at night and sit with us on the couch and chairs.”
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Britain's 'Big Cat X Files' Revealed

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There have been more than 100 sightings of exotic and unidentified animals in England since 2005, according to a dossier compiled by Natural England. They are the stuff of rural legend – but for decades, alleged sightings of big cats stalking the British countryside have been dismissed as hoax or fantasy.Yet now the head of a Government agency responsible for investigating such incidents has declared that he believes these mysterious creatures do indeed exist. His comments follow the release of a dossier by Natural England which lists more than 100 sightings of exotic, non-native and unidentified animals in England since 2005.

Of these, 38 were “big cats”. In some cases, members of the public claimed to have seen the creature itself; on other occasions, they reported finding farm or wild animals which had been attacked or killed.The documents – Britain’s “big cats X Files” – show the extent to which Natural England takes the reports seriously.
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Britain's 'Big Cat X Files' Revealed

bigcat_1591562c

There have been more than 100 sightings of exotic and unidentified animals in England since 2005, according to a dossier compiled by Natural England. They are the stuff of rural legend – but for decades, alleged sightings of big cats stalking the British countryside have been dismissed as hoax or fantasy.Yet now the head of a Government agency responsible for investigating such incidents has declared that he believes these mysterious creatures do indeed exist. His comments follow the release of a dossier by Natural England which lists more than 100 sightings of exotic, non-native and unidentified animals in England since 2005.

Of these, 38 were “big cats”. In some cases, members of the public claimed to have seen the creature itself; on other occasions, they reported finding farm or wild animals which had been attacked or killed.The documents – Britain’s “big cats X Files” – show the extent to which Natural England takes the reports seriously.
More

Monster Exotic Fish Found In Hong Kong Ponds

Hong Kong has launched a search of ponds in public parks after at least 16 fish of an exotic species that can grow up to three metres
(10 feet) long were discovered, apparently dumped by their owners when they grew too big.

A metre-long alligator gar was caught Friday in a park pond after reports that visitors feared for their safety, the South China Morning Post reported on Saturday.The fierce-looking creatures get their name from their long snout, which resembles that of an alligator. While they are an aggressive and carnivorous species, they are not known to attacks humans.

Native to North America, alligator gars are commonly sold in Hong Kong for home aquariums when they are less than 30 centimetres (one foot) long but can grow to three metres and weigh up to 140 kilograms (300 pounds).Another 15 of the fish had been found in ponds and lakes at other parks across Hong Kong, the Post said.

The Leisure and Cultural Services Department said in a statement late Friday the species had no conservation value and would affect the local ecology if released into the wild.”Staff will clean the lakes regularly. Dangerous fishes will be removed when they are found,” it said.It said it would offer non-dangerous fish to animal welfare groups and charities if they were willing to take them.

The fish caught Friday died later that day.
The department warned that people who dumped unwanted pet fish in public parks risked a 2,000-dollar (260-US dollar) fine and two weeks in jail.

(source)