American Idol's Paige Miles Loves Singing And Rescuing Dogs!

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Although Naples, Fla., native Paige Miles got eliminated from American Idol last week, she and fellow bootee Lacey Brown hope to get an apartment in L.A. soon to continue pursuing their musical dreams. Until then, the 24-year-old pre-school teacher can’t wait to get back home to Houston to see her dogs, and save some, too.

“I love dogs and I’m very involved in animal rescue,” Miles “Laila is a Newfoundland mix and a rescue I got two years ago. I have another Shih Tzu mix, or something-mix, we don’t really know – that I got a year ago, plus I have tons of dogs in and out so I always have a lot of dogs at home.”

While home in Houston, Miles spends weekends working with local Petco and PetSmart stores to hold adopt-a-thons for shelter animals that need to be adopted. “I also foster,” Miles says, “which means when we are at a kill space or just need to put a dog some place really quickly, I’ll just bring the dogs home and take care of them until we can find them permanent homes.” Miles also volunteers to clean shelters. “It’s a non-profit so everything we get is from donations and volunteer work,” she adds. “I just love dogs so whatever I can do to help, I’ll do.”
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American Idol's Paige Miles Loves Singing And Rescuing Dogs!

001749665

Although Naples, Fla., native Paige Miles got eliminated from American Idol last week, she and fellow bootee Lacey Brown hope to get an apartment in L.A. soon to continue pursuing their musical dreams. Until then, the 24-year-old pre-school teacher can’t wait to get back home to Houston to see her dogs, and save some, too.

“I love dogs and I’m very involved in animal rescue,” Miles “Laila is a Newfoundland mix and a rescue I got two years ago. I have another Shih Tzu mix, or something-mix, we don’t really know – that I got a year ago, plus I have tons of dogs in and out so I always have a lot of dogs at home.”

While home in Houston, Miles spends weekends working with local Petco and PetSmart stores to hold adopt-a-thons for shelter animals that need to be adopted. “I also foster,” Miles says, “which means when we are at a kill space or just need to put a dog some place really quickly, I’ll just bring the dogs home and take care of them until we can find them permanent homes.” Miles also volunteers to clean shelters. “It’s a non-profit so everything we get is from donations and volunteer work,” she adds. “I just love dogs so whatever I can do to help, I’ll do.”
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Lost German Shepherd Turns Up 600 Miles Away From Home

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About two weeks before Christmas, Deacon, an 85-lb German shepherd, went missing from his family home in rural Stuart, Va.
During the first couple of days, Pamela Holt, her husband Keith, and their daughter Brooklyn, 3, weren’t terribly worried because they figured their nearly two-year-old pet was running in the fields behind their home.

“We have a lot of land and thought Deacon might be enjoying the outdoors,” Holt, who works as a teller for SunTrust bank, “But we soon got worried and called the area dog warden, the pound and the sheriff’s office. After two weeks, we gave up, fearing he had died or was stolen.”Deacon, a gift from Holt to her husband Keith, a teacher and football coach, had become a beloved family member, and everyone was upset. But a curious call in late February from a man in Deland, Fla., changed everything.

“A male voice on the other end said he thought he may have Deacon,” Holt “I was angry at first and thought he was a prankster trying to play a joke on us … I nearly hung up on him.”The man, who said he was from Animal Control in Deland, told Holt he was looking at her dog. Holt said she thought Deacon was dead. But when he asked her if the dog’s name was Bruno, Holt went crazy with joy.
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Do 'Killer Whales' Belong In Theme Parks ?

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The death of a veteran Sea World trainer in Orlando, Fla., Wednesday has spotlighted the campaign of several major animal rights groups to keep marine mammals out of theme parks altogether.Dawn Brancheau was killed when a 12,300-lb. male orca “killer whale” grabbed her in front of an audience at the Orlando theme park.

Now, animal rights activists say that many questions should be asked in the wake of Ms. Brancheau’s death. Sea World has said that the very same orca is responsible for human deaths in 1991 and again in 1999. The Humane Society of the United States has long campaigned for marine mammals to be removed from theme parks.

“These behemoths are denied all of their natural, instinctual inclinations, and we humans tend to think, ‘Well, this is just a bad animal.’ But it is a wild animal, used to running free in an entire ocean, but now confined to a very small space,” says Joyce Tischler, founder of and general counsel for Animal Legal Defense Fund. She compares an orca’s life in captivity in a tank to keeping a human being in a bathtub for his entire life. She says most Americans have romanticized notions of sea life perpetuated by such TV series as “Flipper.” But even dolphins are known to aggressively run their teeth down the backs of humans in hundreds of incidents that are not reported outside the conservation community press, she says.
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Do 'Killer Whales' Belong In Theme Parks ?

capt.photo_1267059629321-1-0

The death of a veteran Sea World trainer in Orlando, Fla., Wednesday has spotlighted the campaign of several major animal rights groups to keep marine mammals out of theme parks altogether.Dawn Brancheau was killed when a 12,300-lb. male orca “killer whale” grabbed her in front of an audience at the Orlando theme park.

Now, animal rights activists say that many questions should be asked in the wake of Ms. Brancheau’s death. Sea World has said that the very same orca is responsible for human deaths in 1991 and again in 1999. The Humane Society of the United States has long campaigned for marine mammals to be removed from theme parks.

“These behemoths are denied all of their natural, instinctual inclinations, and we humans tend to think, ‘Well, this is just a bad animal.’ But it is a wild animal, used to running free in an entire ocean, but now confined to a very small space,” says Joyce Tischler, founder of and general counsel for Animal Legal Defense Fund. She compares an orca’s life in captivity in a tank to keeping a human being in a bathtub for his entire life. She says most Americans have romanticized notions of sea life perpetuated by such TV series as “Flipper.” But even dolphins are known to aggressively run their teeth down the backs of humans in hundreds of incidents that are not reported outside the conservation community press, she says.
More