Maths Formula Proves Giraffes Can Swim

Mathematics has proven that giraffes can swim – even though they wouldn’t be very good at it and nobody has ever seen them do it. Whereas most large animal are extremely good swimmers, it has often been said that giraffes are unable to swim or wade.The authors of the new study hoped to test this oft-quoted theory by using a digital giraffe rather than a real one.

Dr Donald Henderson, of the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology in Canada, and Dr Darren Naish, of the University of Portsmouth, decided to investigate whether or not giraffes could swim after Dr Naish took part in an online debate on the subject.In previous work, Dr Henderson had created a digital model of a giraffe, and had also tested the buoyancy of various computer generated models of animals.The new study, published in the Journal of Theoretical Biology, examines what happened when scientists placed a ‘digital giraffe’ in ‘digital water’.

Dr Naish said: “Many previous studies have claimed that giraffes cannot swim and that they avoid water like the plague, even in an emergency, but we wanted to put the theory to the test in proper controlled experiments.”Creating a digital giraffe involved numerous calculations on weight, mass, size, shape, lung capacity and centre of gravity.Calculations were made to discover rotation dynamics, flotation dynamics and the external surface area of both a giraffe and – for control purposes – a horse.
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Zimbabwe Plans To Sell Elephants, Jackals, Cats To North Korea

Zimbabwe plans to sell animals including elephants, jackals and wild cats to a zoo in North Korea’s capital, Pyongyang, according to Vitalis Chadenga, director of the African nation’s parks authority.The Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority is also studying applications from Japan, Mozambique and three other unidentified nations to buy species, Chadenga said by phone today from the capital, Harare.

“We don’t just export wildlife without first ascertaining if the conditions they will be held in are safe and we consider that conditions in Pyongyang will be suitable,” he said. Under both domestic and international law, Zimbabwe is allowed to sell wildlife to foreign nations, Chadenga said.Among the animals being sent to North Korea, an impoverished, communist nation, are elephants, giraffes, zebras, jackals, hyenas and civet cats, none of which are endangered in Zimbabwe, Chadenga said.
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Morefu, One Of The World's Oldest Giraffes, Dies at 24

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Visitors to Alabama’s Birmingham Zoo will notice the mood is a little less festive this week, in the wake of a sad loss: Morefu, the zoo’s 24-year-old male giraffe, was euthanized on Tuesday.

In a statement, Dr. Clay Hilton, the zoo’s vice president of animal care and conservation, said that “Morefu had arthritis and other geriatric conditions that no longer responded to medications, and his quality of life was declining. He was a beautiful, majestic animal and we will miss him.”

Morefu, who arrived in Birmingham in 1985, was 18 ft. tall and weighed around 2,140 lbs. He was often seen hovering around his exhibit’s feeding station, where he’d playfully hog food from his fellow giraffes — females Mara and Willow, and male Jalil. He’d sired 10 offspring in his time at the zoo, including Willow.

“Morefu was one of the oldest living giraffes in the world,” said Steve Feldman, senior vice president of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums. In fact, he was named the oldest living male giraffe in North America by the International Species Information Systems, in addition to being the largest giraffe at the Birmingham Zoo.

In the wild, giraffes often have a lifespan of 10 to 15 years, so Morefu’s 24 were notably remarkable. “He lived a longer life than had he been in the wild,” said Feldman. “The quality of care the Birmingham Zoo provided Morefu was second to none.”


(source)

Morefu, One Of The World's Oldest Giraffes, Dies at 24

001487369

Visitors to Alabama’s Birmingham Zoo will notice the mood is a little less festive this week, in the wake of a sad loss: Morefu, the zoo’s 24-year-old male giraffe, was euthanized on Tuesday.

In a statement, Dr. Clay Hilton, the zoo’s vice president of animal care and conservation, said that “Morefu had arthritis and other geriatric conditions that no longer responded to medications, and his quality of life was declining. He was a beautiful, majestic animal and we will miss him.”

Morefu, who arrived in Birmingham in 1985, was 18 ft. tall and weighed around 2,140 lbs. He was often seen hovering around his exhibit’s feeding station, where he’d playfully hog food from his fellow giraffes — females Mara and Willow, and male Jalil. He’d sired 10 offspring in his time at the zoo, including Willow.

“Morefu was one of the oldest living giraffes in the world,” said Steve Feldman, senior vice president of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums. In fact, he was named the oldest living male giraffe in North America by the International Species Information Systems, in addition to being the largest giraffe at the Birmingham Zoo.

In the wild, giraffes often have a lifespan of 10 to 15 years, so Morefu’s 24 were notably remarkable. “He lived a longer life than had he been in the wild,” said Feldman. “The quality of care the Birmingham Zoo provided Morefu was second to none.”


(source)

Have You Ever Seen An Okapi ???

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This baby was recently born at the Denver Zoo — she’s an Okapi named Kalispell. (Collective “awww.”) Not only is she absolutely adoro, she’s a mix of two unlikely species. Learn all about this rare animal .Originally a cross between zebras and giraffes, the Okapi (oh-COP-ee) was only known by natives of the Ituri Forest until officially “discovered” by scientists about 100 years ago in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
It’s actually the only living relative of the giraffe.Those spindly legs and over sized ears remind me of a giraffe where those stripes have zebra written all over them! It’s not known how many exist in the wild (probably about 25,000 in the wild), but there are only 89 currently alive in captivity.

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She’s currently gaining strength and stability with those spindly legs indoors. In the wild, they are browsers, eating 40 to 65 pounds of leaves, twigs, and fruits each day but, in captivity, usually dine on alfalfa hay, leafy acacia branches, and healthy veggies. Zookeepers are carefully monitoring Kalispell’s progress as she becomes more self-sufficient and predict her public zoo debut soon!

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