10 Species You Can Kiss Goodbye

1.1

California Condor
A resident of the Grand Canyon area and the western coastal mountains of California, the carrion-eating California condor (Gymnogyps californianus) has a lifespan of 50 years, making it one of the world’s longest-living birds. Because of poaching, lead poisoning, and habitat loss, however, it’s also one of the world’s rarest bird species–one that was almost wiped out completely in the 1980s. With the help of conservation efforts, 332 condors are now known to exist, including 152 in the wild.

1.3

Ganges Shark
This rare and elusive species of shark (Glyphis gangeticus) makes its home in India’s Ganges River, where it has a reputation as a man-eater, although people may be confusing it with the more dangerous bull shark. One of 20 sharks on the IUCN’s Red List of endangered species, the Ganges shark is highly sought after for its oil. Rampant fishing, habitat degradation from pollution, and increasing river utilization, however, remain the primary causes for its rapid disappearance.
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How To Cope With The Death Of A Pet

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Saying goodbye to a beloved pet can be difficult. Many of those who have experienced the death of a pet compare it to losing a family member. Animals provide emotional support, companionship, and unconditional love to their owners, so when they pass away, feelings of sorrow and expressions of grief are normal and should be expected.

Accept your feelings
People often feel that the death of a pet is somehow insignificant or less important than the death of a loved one. Comments such as, “Oh, he just lost his dog” are common. When coping with a pet’s death, however, you must acknowledge the deep grief and profound sense off loss that you feel. Coming home to a quiet house or seeing a pet’s empty bed can trigger feelings of sadness. Do not be afraid to accept and express these negative emotions even when others many see them as trivial.

Help children cope
The death of a pet can be a traumatic experience for children, and long bouts of illness or euthanasia can be even harder for kids to understand. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) recommends having a memorial service to allow children to honor and remember the pet: “Sitting down with the family and sharing memories of your pet can make your children sad – but it can make them laugh, too, and will help your child understand that everyone is feeling the loss as well.”
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