Endangered Crocodiles Hatched In Cambodia

Cambodia – Conservationists in Cambodia are celebrating the hatching of a clutch of eggs from one of the world’s most critically endangered animals, the Siamese crocodile.Thirteen infants crawled out of their shells over the weekend in a remote part of the Cardamom Mountains in southwestern Cambodia, following a weekslong vigil by researchers who found them in the jungle.

Experts believe as few as 250 Siamese crocodiles are left in the wild, almost all of them in Cambodia but with a few spread between Laos, Myanmar, Indonesia, Vietnam and possibly Thailand.The operation to protect and hatch the eggs was mounted by United Kingdom-based Fauna and Flora International, for whom conservation of this once-abundant species is a key program.

“Every nest counts,” program manager Adam Starr told Associated Press Television News. “To be able to find a nest is a very big success story, to be able to hatch eggs properly is an even bigger success story.”The nest, with 22 eggs inside, was discovered in the isolated Areng Valley. Fauna and Flora International volunteers removed 15 of them to a safe site and incubated them in a compost heap to replicate the original nest. They left seven behind because they appeared to be unfertilized.
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Mekong Tiger Population At 'Crisis Point': WWF

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Governments must act decisively to prevent the extinction of tigers in Southeast Asia’s Greater Mekong region, where numbers have plunged more than 70 percent in 12 years, the WWF said Tuesday.The wild tiger population across Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam has dropped from an estimated 1,200 in 1998 — the last Year of the Tiger — to around 350 today, according to the conservation group.The report was released ahead of a landmark three-day conference on tiger conservation which opens Wednesday in the Thai resort town of Hua Hin, with ministers from 13 Asian tiger range countries attending.

It said the regional decline was reflected in the global wild tiger population, which is at an all-time low of 3,200, down from an estimated 20,000 in the 1980s and 100,000 a century ago.”Today, wild tiger populations are at a crisis point,” the WWF said, ahead of the start of the Year of the Tiger on February 14, according to the Chinese lunar calendar.
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Mekong Tiger Population At 'Crisis Point': WWF

capt.photo_1264464389903-1-0

Governments must act decisively to prevent the extinction of tigers in Southeast Asia’s Greater Mekong region, where numbers have plunged more than 70 percent in 12 years, the WWF said Tuesday.The wild tiger population across Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam has dropped from an estimated 1,200 in 1998 — the last Year of the Tiger — to around 350 today, according to the conservation group.The report was released ahead of a landmark three-day conference on tiger conservation which opens Wednesday in the Thai resort town of Hua Hin, with ministers from 13 Asian tiger range countries attending.

It said the regional decline was reflected in the global wild tiger population, which is at an all-time low of 3,200, down from an estimated 20,000 in the 1980s and 100,000 a century ago.”Today, wild tiger populations are at a crisis point,” the WWF said, ahead of the start of the Year of the Tiger on February 14, according to the Chinese lunar calendar.
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