Your Pet Could Be Allergic To Her Food

4

One day your cat is minding her own business, sleeping peacefully atop the laundry basket or terrorizing the dog. The next, it’s scratching like mad. Fleas are an obvious suspect, but not the only one. Food allergy is “quite common in cats,” Christine Bellezza, a veterinarian and the co-director of the Feline Health Center at Cornell University,

Itching is the number-one symptom of food allergies, especially around the face, paws and ears, according to PetPlace.com. Other signs include ear infections, hair loss, and small bumps on the skin. Less commonly, food allergies can also upset a cat’s stomach, causing diarrhea or vomiting, says Bellezza.A food allergy can strike cats of any age, though they’re rare in very young kittens, according to Bellezza. “Usually they develop an allergy to a food that they’ve been eating for a long period of time,” she says.

And that food can be just about anything. “What we see most commonly are allergies to fish, beef, dairy products, wheat, corn, and soy,” Bellezza tells Paw Nation. According to PetPlace.com, beef, dairy products and wheat account for two-thirds of all cat food allergies.
More

Advertisements

What's a Coati?

coati2

Closely related to racoons, the Coati Mundi is a curious, clever, and affectionate critter. These photos were taken last week at Germany’s Darmstadt Zoo. Coatis use special postures to communicate like hiding their long nose between the front paws as a sign of submission or lowering the head, baring their teeth and hopping about to signal aggresion. Coincidentally, that’s also how I start a fight.

coati3

(source)

What's a Coati?

coati2

Closely related to racoons, the Coati Mundi is a curious, clever, and affectionate critter. These photos were taken last week at Germany’s Darmstadt Zoo. Coatis use special postures to communicate like hiding their long nose between the front paws as a sign of submission or lowering the head, baring their teeth and hopping about to signal aggresion. Coincidentally, that’s also how I start a fight.

coati3

(source)

Putty In Their Paws: Why We Do What Cats Want

Cats domesticated themselves ages ago so that people would take care of them and have honed the pitch of their meows to a point where people can’t ignore them, say a pair of recent studies.

caT

Tamara Fox goes to extremes for her cats that she wouldn’t dream of for even her best friend.
“I clean their butts when necessary,” she says of 10-year-old Emma, a lilac-point Siamese mix, and 15-year-old Brianne, a chocolate seal-point Himalayan. “I wouldn’t do that for anyone else.”
Dena Harris of Madison, N.C., endures a daily slapping around by her 8-year-old cat, Olivia, who taps her on the shoulder early each morning until she gets up and feeds her.

And Cecile Moore put up with acts of extortion from her cat Henry who regularly sat on the top of the bureau of her Athens, Ga., home and scooted a bottle of perfume toward the edge until she got out of bed.
While we’d never tolerate that behavior from a house guest — or even our own kids — we take it from cats, along with their extreme independence and their refusal to show affection except on their own terms and frequent shedding. Our relationship is based on us giving and them taking — kind of like a bad boyfriend. And yet, we adore, feed and house them, and we constantly try to please them in a hopelessly co-dependent kind of way. What does that say about us?
More