Soccer-Playing Penguins Bend It Like Beak-ham

The South Korean penguins might not have much in the way of soccer skills, but that hasn’t stopped their coach for putting them on the field. The 11 flightless footballers can be found wearing the national team colors at the Everland aquarium, located about an hour outside of Seoul.

The penguins’ trainer, Lee Kwang-hee, hopes this spirited group of admittedly wobbly players will inspire the South Korean team to reach the next round at the FIFA World Cup in South Africa, as you’ll see in the video below from the New York Post.
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Penguin Is Missing his Tux

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Nope, it’s not a wetsuit — a writer on the subantarctic island of South Georgia recently snapped a shot of an all-black king penguin, a complete rarity in the animal world. Author Andrew Evans sent the image to National Geographic, whose editors contacted Canadian ornithologist Dr. Allan Baker for his input.

“Well that is astonishing,” Baker told National Geographic. “I’ve never ever seen that before. It’s a one in a zillion kind of mutation somewhere.” He went on to explain that melanistic birds (those with extra skin/feather pigmentation) often have white spots where pigment hasn’t colored their feathers, but it’s incredibly rare for color deposits to happen in an abnormal spot — like on this penguin’s breast feathers.

Since the magazine first printed the photo online on March 3, several readers have written in to discuss their own black penguin sightings. But none yet seem to compare to this guy, whom Evans described as a “single black king moving across a chessboard of so many white pawns.” Checkmate!

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'Gay' Penguins Rear A Chick In German Zoo

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Two homosexual penguins have successfully hatched an egg and are now proudly rearing the chick, a German zoo has said. The zoo, in Bremerhaven, northern Germany, says the adult males – Z and Vielpunkt – were given an egg which was rejected by its biological parents.

It says the couple are now happily rearing the chick, which has reached four weeks old.”Z and Vielpunkt, both males, gladly accepted their ‘Easter present’ and began straight away with hatching the egg,” said a statement from the zoo.”Since the chick arrived they are behaving in the same way as one would expect a heterosexual couple to do. Both happy fathers are now diligently handling the everyday care … of their adopted offspring,” the zoo said.

Z and Vielpunkt are part of a six-strong gay community among the zoo’s collection of endangered Humboldt penguins who rose to fame in 2005 when four Swedish females were brought in an unsuccessful, and controversial, attempt to “cure” them.
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'Gay' Penguins Rear A Chick In German Zoo

penguin_1416632a

Two homosexual penguins have successfully hatched an egg and are now proudly rearing the chick, a German zoo has said. The zoo, in Bremerhaven, northern Germany, says the adult males – Z and Vielpunkt – were given an egg which was rejected by its biological parents.

It says the couple are now happily rearing the chick, which has reached four weeks old.”Z and Vielpunkt, both males, gladly accepted their ‘Easter present’ and began straight away with hatching the egg,” said a statement from the zoo.”Since the chick arrived they are behaving in the same way as one would expect a heterosexual couple to do. Both happy fathers are now diligently handling the everyday care … of their adopted offspring,” the zoo said.

Z and Vielpunkt are part of a six-strong gay community among the zoo’s collection of endangered Humboldt penguins who rose to fame in 2005 when four Swedish females were brought in an unsuccessful, and controversial, attempt to “cure” them.
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King Penguin-Stands With A Group Of Fluffy Young Penguins

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Compared with the rest of the crowd, he looks a little underdressed.The lone adult King Penguin – the one in black and white – was spotted wandering into the middle of a gathering of fluffy chicks fattening up on the shoreline.

The chicks, known as woolies for obvious reasons, will hang on to their warm brown downy feathers for a year. They also develop a thick layer of blubber to keep them warm through the winter.The birds pictured are just a handful of the 400,000 King Penguins living at the world’s largest colony on South Georgia Island in the southern Atlantic Ocean.

Photographer David C. Schultz, who took this shot, named it Penguin Day Care.He said: ‘I like this photo because the adult is leaning out and seems to be peering around the chicks.’He added: ‘The penguins will come right up to you and at times they seem to be the welcoming committee for the island.’King penguin chicks are cared for by their parents for around 40 days before they join a creche for warmth and protection from predators. Their parents return occasionally during the winter to feed them.
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Seven Of The Biggest Beasts Of All Time

We all know about the size of dinosaurs, of course, but how about a rodent the size of a bull, a sea scorpion bigger than a man, a frog as large as a beach ball, a penguin the size of a small adult human, a 1,000-pound ground-sloth-like marsupial, and a shark that may have grown longer than 50 feet and weighed up to 30 times more than the largest modern great white?

1. Biggest Snake Fossil Found in Colombia Coal Mine

Illustration of Titanoboa cerrejonensis by Jason Bourque/ Released by Nature
The biggest snake that ever lived (that we know about) was a massive anaconda-like beast that slithered through steamy tropical rainforests about 60 million years ago feasting on primitive crocodiles, National Geographic News reported today.”Fossils discovered in northeastern Colombia’s Cerrejon coal mine indicate the reptile was at least 42 feet (13 meters) long and weighed 2,500 pounds (1,135 kilograms),” contributor John Roach reported.he snake would have killed its prey by slow suffocation — wrapping around it and squeezing, just like a modern python or boa. Only this snake was twice the size of today’s largest constrictors

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Humans would stand no chance against one of these giant snakes, said Hans-Dieter Sues, paleontologist and associate director for research and collections at the National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. “Given the sheer size, the sheer cross section of that snake, it would be probably like one of those devices they use to crush old cars in a junkyard.”
Precloacal vertebra of an adult Green Anaconda dwarfed by a vertebra of the giant boid snake Titanoboa cerrejonensis (photo credit Kenneth Krysko) and (lower photo) comparison of a vertebra of Titanoboa with the body of a live Python regius (photo credit Jason Head)

2. Bull-Size Rodent Discovered — Biggest Yet

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