India Needs More Parks And Corridors For Long-Term Survival Of Its Animals

india

In a new study, an international team of scientists has determined that the long-term survival of many large species in the midst of rapid economic growth in India will require improving existing protected areas and establishing new protected areas and corridors.The study, carried out by researchers at the Wildlife Conservation Society, Duke University, and other groups, found that country’s protected area system and human cultural tolerance for some species are key to conserving the subcontinent’s tigers, elephants, and other large mammals.

The researchers created models to estimate extinction probability for 25 large mammal species, determining current species distributions along with more than 30,000 historical records from natural history, taxidermy and museum records dating back 200 years.The models were used to gauge how factors such as protected areas, forest cover, elevation, and human demographics, and cultural attitudes impact extinction predictions.The results of the analysis found that all 25 species would experience some level of local extinction due to a variety of factors such as habitat loss and human population growth and development.
More

Advertisements

Meet Oscar, The World's Oldest Pig!

001689085

When Oscar was crowned the Guinness Book of World Records’ oldest living pig, he had a party and celebrated with friends.
Wearing a custom-made necklace bearing his name, the 20-year-old potbellied pig made the rounds and grunted hellos at family, neighbors and old babysitters, who shared their memories of the times they’d had together.

Remember when your mom had to train you from jumping on the couch because you’d gotten too big?Remember when you used to come by my yard to eat the peaches from my tree?”Each person has a different memory of Osc,” says owner Stacy Kimbell, who shares her Dallas home with Oscar, her boyfriend Terry Mackin, Mackin’s potbellied pig Ziffle, two guinea pigs and a cat.
More

Meet Oscar, The World's Oldest Pig!

001689085

When Oscar was crowned the Guinness Book of World Records’ oldest living pig, he had a party and celebrated with friends.
Wearing a custom-made necklace bearing his name, the 20-year-old potbellied pig made the rounds and grunted hellos at family, neighbors and old babysitters, who shared their memories of the times they’d had together.

Remember when your mom had to train you from jumping on the couch because you’d gotten too big?Remember when you used to come by my yard to eat the peaches from my tree?”Each person has a different memory of Osc,” says owner Stacy Kimbell, who shares her Dallas home with Oscar, her boyfriend Terry Mackin, Mackin’s potbellied pig Ziffle, two guinea pigs and a cat.
More

Switzerland Rejects Plan To Appoint Lawyers For Animals

Antoine F. Goetschel

Swiss voters have overwhelmingly rejected a controversial plan to appoint lawyers for animals.All of the country’s 26 cantons, Switzerland’s federal states, yesterday voted against the proposal by animal rights activists to extend nationwide a system in place in Zurich.Overall, just 29.5 per cent of voters were in favour. In seven cantons the ‘No’ vote was more than 80 per cent.

If citizens had voted for the initiative, each canton would have appointed a lawyer to act on behalf of animals at taxpayers’ expense.Switzerland has some of the most stringent animal rights laws in the world.It recently changed its constitution to protect the ‘dignity’ of plant life and made a law last year establishing rights for creatures such as goldfish and canaries.
More

Scientists End Experiments Burying Pigs In Snow

snow pig

Scientists say they will no longer conduct avalanche experiments monitoring the deaths of pigs buried in snow, after animal rights groups protested their methods.Anesthesiologist Peter Paal says he and his colleagues decided Friday to stop their work because of growing media pressure generated by activists calling it cruel and pointless.

The project in the Austrian Alps was focused on establishing what factors make it possible for humans to survive an avalanche in an air pocket until rescued without suffering permanent brain damage.The scientists had argued that during two weeks of experiments no pigs had suffered because they were sedated and given an anesthetic beforehand.


(source)

Pigs Really Can Fly….With The Help Of A Trampoline

pig fly

Gwen Howell discovered her pet’s hidden talent after leaving her on the family’s trampoline in their garden.Scarlet, a Hungarian mangalitza, loves bouncing around the orchard of her home in Shrewsbury, Shropshire. Mrs Howell, 46, an estate agent, said the piglet took over the hobby from their other pet pig Percy after he got too fat.

She and husband Steve, 43, had placed Percy, who is also Scarlet’s father, on their eight year-old daughter Alex’s trampoline several months ago when they discovered its unique circus skills.Gwen said: “We decided we would try and put our boar, Percy on the trampoline one day and he absolutely loved it.
More

"Micro-Pigs" Are The Latest Celebrity Pet Craze A

MICRO PIG 1

With their wrinkled little snouts, tiny trotters and oversized ears, they are irresistibly cute.But while these micro pigs may be minuscule, their price tag is anything but.In exchange for up to £700, owners take home a pet which weighs just 9oz at birth and is the size of a tea cup.

Two years later the pigs are fully grown – but still only weigh up to 65lb and stand at around 14in tall.Unlike popular myth, the pigs are exceedingly clean and enjoy the company of people.The adorable animals, which grow to just 14in tall, are being snapped up by celebrities, including Harry Potter actor Rupert Grint, who plays Ron Weasley.

MICRO PIG 2

‘Demand for micro pigs is soaring and we are inundated with inquiries every day,’ says Jane Croft, 42, who has given up her job to breed them full time.‘It’s amazing how popular they have suddenly become and just how many people want pigs as pets.’Micro pigs are much smaller than a standard farm pig and weigh 9oz, about the size of a tea cup when they are born.
More