Your Pet Could Be Allergic To Her Food

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One day your cat is minding her own business, sleeping peacefully atop the laundry basket or terrorizing the dog. The next, it’s scratching like mad. Fleas are an obvious suspect, but not the only one. Food allergy is “quite common in cats,” Christine Bellezza, a veterinarian and the co-director of the Feline Health Center at Cornell University,

Itching is the number-one symptom of food allergies, especially around the face, paws and ears, according to PetPlace.com. Other signs include ear infections, hair loss, and small bumps on the skin. Less commonly, food allergies can also upset a cat’s stomach, causing diarrhea or vomiting, says Bellezza.A food allergy can strike cats of any age, though they’re rare in very young kittens, according to Bellezza. “Usually they develop an allergy to a food that they’ve been eating for a long period of time,” she says.

And that food can be just about anything. “What we see most commonly are allergies to fish, beef, dairy products, wheat, corn, and soy,” Bellezza tells Paw Nation. According to PetPlace.com, beef, dairy products and wheat account for two-thirds of all cat food allergies.
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Is Your Dog's Pet Food Making Him Sick?

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Your dog is scratching like crazy, or sick to his stomach. Could his food be the culprit?

Food allergies aren’t extremely common in dogs, but they aren’t uncommon either. Food allergies affect dogs in two primary ways, says Korinn Saker, a clinical nutritionist at the North Carolina State School of Veterinary Medicine who specializes in canine allergies. “We either see skin issues, or GI [gastrointestinal] issues,” she says. If your dog is experiencing vomiting or diarrhea on a regular basis, or is itching constantly and licking or biting at his skin or fur, allergies may be to blame. (Your vet can help you rule out other ailments, like parasites or infections, that could cause similar symptoms.)

Unfortunately, it can be hard to tell whether an allergic dog is having a reaction to his food or to an environmental allergen such as pollen. (Dogs can also become allergic to food they’ve happily eaten their entire lives making detection even more difficult.) Still, there are ways to tell if food is the foe, Sakar says. “The most definitive way to do that is to do a feeding elimination trial,” she says. In other words, try removing the suspected ingredient or ingredients from the dog’s diet, and see what happens.
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Is Your Dog's Pet Food Making Him Sick?

3

Your dog is scratching like crazy, or sick to his stomach. Could his food be the culprit?

Food allergies aren’t extremely common in dogs, but they aren’t uncommon either. Food allergies affect dogs in two primary ways, says Korinn Saker, a clinical nutritionist at the North Carolina State School of Veterinary Medicine who specializes in canine allergies. “We either see skin issues, or GI [gastrointestinal] issues,” she says. If your dog is experiencing vomiting or diarrhea on a regular basis, or is itching constantly and licking or biting at his skin or fur, allergies may be to blame. (Your vet can help you rule out other ailments, like parasites or infections, that could cause similar symptoms.)

Unfortunately, it can be hard to tell whether an allergic dog is having a reaction to his food or to an environmental allergen such as pollen. (Dogs can also become allergic to food they’ve happily eaten their entire lives making detection even more difficult.) Still, there are ways to tell if food is the foe, Sakar says. “The most definitive way to do that is to do a feeding elimination trial,” she says. In other words, try removing the suspected ingredient or ingredients from the dog’s diet, and see what happens.
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Common Cat Health Problems

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While cats are not, by nature, complainers, that doesn’t mean that they do not get sick. There are many common cat health problems. Fortunately, most can be treated with good results if caught early enough
Here are some of the most common cat health problems of which cat owners should be aware. Keep in mind that no information provided here is meant to take the place of advice from you vet.

Fleas

Fleas are probably the most common problem relating to your cat’s health. Fleas are not just a nuisance, they can carry diseases which can be transmitted to your cat.Also, some cats are allergic to flea bites and serious skin irritation can result.While getting rid of a flea infestation is no small task, preventing an infestation is much easier.Applying topical flea prevention each month is the best way to stop fleas from infesting your cat.Fleas can hide deep within your cat’s coat, so you may never see a flea until it is too late.Regular grooming of your cat will help you spot a flea problem at the very early stages. Be sure to take a look deep within the fur as fleas like to make their home close to the base of the fur. If you cat is scratching a lot, that is one obvious signs that fleas may be present. Also, if you notice what look like specks of dirt in her fur, that is likely a sign of fleas as well.


Feline Leukemia

Feline leukemia is spread from cat to cat through interactions such as biting and grooming. It can also be spread through urine and by sharing a litter box. Because of the way this disease is spread, an outdoor cat has a much higher risk of contracting the disease than does an indoor cat. While it is a good idea for all cats to be vaccinated, it is absolutely essential that a cat that spends any time outdoors receive the vaccine for this disease. This virus can cause cancer, blood disorders and weakens the immune system. Many of the complications resulting from this disease can be life threatening.When first infected, it is unlikely that the cat will show any symptoms at all. As time goes on, and the virus begins to cause secondary diseases, symptoms will begin to appear. These may include gradual weight loss, diarrhea, swollen lymph nodes, pale gums and seizures. Of course, any one of these symptoms should result in a trip to your vet.Because vaccines are not effective 100% of the time, the only sure way to stop your cat from getting Feline Leukemia is to be sure that she does not come in contact with cats that are infected. Keep cats indoors and be sure that any new cats you bring into the home have tested negative for the disease.

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