Zebra Puts Head Into Hippo's Mouth But Escapes Unhurt After Cleaning Predator's Teeth

article-1257204-08AC2697000005DC-825_634x366

This inquisitive zebra diced with death when it leaned in to the gaping mouth of a hippopotamus.One of the most aggressive animals in the world, the hippo can savage its victim to death with its menacing jaw.But the zebra seems perfectly unaware of the precarious position he’s in as he teeters on the edge of the water dangerously close to the animal’s razor-sharp teeth.
Despite appearing to be just seconds away from imminent death, the striped creature escaped unharmed.Much to the surprise of zoo visitors, the animal was merely cleaning the hippo’s teeth.The extraordinary spectacle was captured by photographer Jill Sonsteby at Zurich Zoo, in Switzerland.

article-1257204-08AC276D000005DC-686_634x370

More

Advertisements

Zebra Puts Head Into Hippo's Mouth But Escapes Unhurt After Cleaning Predator's Teeth

article-1257204-08AC2697000005DC-825_634x366

This inquisitive zebra diced with death when it leaned in to the gaping mouth of a hippopotamus.One of the most aggressive animals in the world, the hippo can savage its victim to death with its menacing jaw.But the zebra seems perfectly unaware of the precarious position he’s in as he teeters on the edge of the water dangerously close to the animal’s razor-sharp teeth.
Despite appearing to be just seconds away from imminent death, the striped creature escaped unharmed.Much to the surprise of zoo visitors, the animal was merely cleaning the hippo’s teeth.The extraordinary spectacle was captured by photographer Jill Sonsteby at Zurich Zoo, in Switzerland.

article-1257204-08AC276D000005DC-686_634x370

More

Keeping Your Cat's Teeth Clean And Healthy

cat-mouth

They need them to eat, to protect themselves, yet for seven out of ten cats, teeth troubles begin by the time they are three.The key to healthy feline teeth is regular at home and professional cleaning but many well-meaning pet owners don’t know how important this is. And it’s not completely their fault. “Most veterinarians don’t address dental health in cats,” says Dr. Michel Selmer, veterinarian at Advanced Animal Care Center in Huntington Station, N.Y. A vocal advocate for the importance of dental health in pets, Selmer devotes 20 percent of his practice to oral issues.

In honor of Pet Dental Health Month — and for the sake of 70 percent of American kitties — Paw Nation asked Selmer for tips on how to keep your cat’s mouth in good shape.The process starts when they’re kittens, with pet owners using a finger cot or gauze and toothpaste made specifically for them. The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) recommends dipping your finger in tuna water before rubbing it on your kitty’s gums to make the experience more pleasant. If you’re uncomfortable, or you have just adopted an older cat who won’t stomach your finger in his mouth, a once-yearly cleaning at the vet’s office is recommended by the AVMA, beginning after a cat turns two.

More

Keeping Your Cat's Teeth Clean And Healthy

cat-mouth

They need them to eat, to protect themselves, yet for seven out of ten cats, teeth troubles begin by the time they are three.The key to healthy feline teeth is regular at home and professional cleaning but many well-meaning pet owners don’t know how important this is. And it’s not completely their fault. “Most veterinarians don’t address dental health in cats,” says Dr. Michel Selmer, veterinarian at Advanced Animal Care Center in Huntington Station, N.Y. A vocal advocate for the importance of dental health in pets, Selmer devotes 20 percent of his practice to oral issues.

In honor of Pet Dental Health Month — and for the sake of 70 percent of American kitties — Paw Nation asked Selmer for tips on how to keep your cat’s mouth in good shape.The process starts when they’re kittens, with pet owners using a finger cot or gauze and toothpaste made specifically for them. The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) recommends dipping your finger in tuna water before rubbing it on your kitty’s gums to make the experience more pleasant. If you’re uncomfortable, or you have just adopted an older cat who won’t stomach your finger in his mouth, a once-yearly cleaning at the vet’s office is recommended by the AVMA, beginning after a cat turns two.

More

Fish With Human-Like Teeth

15 Pacu teeth 3.jpg

Pacu fish, cousins to the piranha and known as “frugivores,” have human-like teeth that can crack nuts and fruits.They and many other kinds of species of fish with weird teeth are featured in “Hooked”.

human like long teeth

Also known as the “Vampire Fish,” The Payara earns its “vampire” nickname with a set of two-inch daggers thrusting up from its bottom jaw.

(source)

Seven Of The Biggest Beasts Of All Time

We all know about the size of dinosaurs, of course, but how about a rodent the size of a bull, a sea scorpion bigger than a man, a frog as large as a beach ball, a penguin the size of a small adult human, a 1,000-pound ground-sloth-like marsupial, and a shark that may have grown longer than 50 feet and weighed up to 30 times more than the largest modern great white?

1. Biggest Snake Fossil Found in Colombia Coal Mine

Illustration of Titanoboa cerrejonensis by Jason Bourque/ Released by Nature
The biggest snake that ever lived (that we know about) was a massive anaconda-like beast that slithered through steamy tropical rainforests about 60 million years ago feasting on primitive crocodiles, National Geographic News reported today.”Fossils discovered in northeastern Colombia’s Cerrejon coal mine indicate the reptile was at least 42 feet (13 meters) long and weighed 2,500 pounds (1,135 kilograms),” contributor John Roach reported.he snake would have killed its prey by slow suffocation — wrapping around it and squeezing, just like a modern python or boa. Only this snake was twice the size of today’s largest constrictors

.biggest-snake-picture2

Humans would stand no chance against one of these giant snakes, said Hans-Dieter Sues, paleontologist and associate director for research and collections at the National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. “Given the sheer size, the sheer cross section of that snake, it would be probably like one of those devices they use to crush old cars in a junkyard.”
Precloacal vertebra of an adult Green Anaconda dwarfed by a vertebra of the giant boid snake Titanoboa cerrejonensis (photo credit Kenneth Krysko) and (lower photo) comparison of a vertebra of Titanoboa with the body of a live Python regius (photo credit Jason Head)

2. Bull-Size Rodent Discovered — Biggest Yet

biggest-rodent-picture
More