India Needs More Parks And Corridors For Long-Term Survival Of Its Animals

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In a new study, an international team of scientists has determined that the long-term survival of many large species in the midst of rapid economic growth in India will require improving existing protected areas and establishing new protected areas and corridors.The study, carried out by researchers at the Wildlife Conservation Society, Duke University, and other groups, found that country’s protected area system and human cultural tolerance for some species are key to conserving the subcontinent’s tigers, elephants, and other large mammals.

The researchers created models to estimate extinction probability for 25 large mammal species, determining current species distributions along with more than 30,000 historical records from natural history, taxidermy and museum records dating back 200 years.The models were used to gauge how factors such as protected areas, forest cover, elevation, and human demographics, and cultural attitudes impact extinction predictions.The results of the analysis found that all 25 species would experience some level of local extinction due to a variety of factors such as habitat loss and human population growth and development.
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Cancer Kills Many Sea Lions, And Its Cause Remains A Mystery

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For 14 years, since they first reported that a disturbing proportion of deaths among rescued California sea lions were caused by metastatic cancer, researchers have been trying to pinpoint the source of the illness.In 1996, Dr. Frances Gulland, the director of veterinary science at the Marine Mammal Center in Sausalito, and colleagues at the University of California, Davis, found that a striking 18 percent of deaths in stranded adult sea lions were the result of tumors in the reproductive and urinary tracts.

“It’s such an aggressive cancer, and it’s so unusual to see such a high prevalence of cancer in a wild population,” Dr. Gulland said. “That suggests that there’s some carcinogen in the ocean that could be affecting these animals.”The center has not observed the same syndrome in other seals.Years of study have led researchers to think the answer lies not with any one culprit, but with several. Their research has added to a body of evidence concerning industrial contaminants in the ocean and their effects on the health of its inhabitants.
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China Says It Has 6,000 Captive Tigers

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China said Tuesday it had nearly 6,000 tigers in captivity and could breed 1,000 more every year, amid international controversy over the benefits of farming the endangered species.The numbers were announced by Yin Hong, vice head of the State Forestry Administration, according to a spokesman at the agency who refused to be named.”There are close to 6,000 tigers that have been artifically bred and raised in China,” the official China News Service quoted Yin saying.

“These tigers can breed over 1,000 baby tigers every year.”Yin’s comments came as China prepares to ring in the Year of the Tiger, which begins February 14, amid mounting worldwide concern over dwindling numbers of the great cats.Yin said there were just 50 to 60 wild tigers left in China. Conservation groups have said recently fewer than 50 still roam the country.

There are four varieties of wild tigers in China, and one of them — the South China tiger — has not been spotted in the wild since the late 1970s. In the 1950s, there were around 4,000 of the subspecies.Degradation of the animal’s habitat and poaching of the tiger and its prey are blamed for its rapid disappearance.In the 1980s, China set up tiger farms to try and preserve the big cats, intending to release some into the wild.But experts warn it will be difficult for captive tigers to re-adapt to the wild, and the sheer number of the endangered animals kept in farms now poses a challenge.
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Woman Bites TIGER !!!

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Amazing picture of maneater being nipped on the nose by animal trainer.Delivering a loving nip to the tip of a tiger’s nose, this woman proves the big feline is just a pussy cat as she prepares him for his performance in the upcoming Chinese Lunar Year festivities.The trainer nuzzled with the animal at Dalian Forest Zoo, in Dalian, Liaoning province, where the troupe are putting in practice ahead of the celebrations, which start on February 14.China has an estimated 50 or fewer tigers left living in the wild, but efforts to stabilise one population in the bleak northeast are starting to pay off, it was claimed today.

Tigers once roamed huge swathes of China, right up to the now booming east coast. Their population has collapsed due to habitat destruction on the back of rapid economic development and poaching for tiger products to use in traditional medicine.
About 10 still live in the southwestern province of Yunnan, some 15 in Tibet, and 20 or so in northwestern Jilin and Heilongjiang provinces, said Xie Yan, China Country Program Director of the Wildlife Conservation Society.

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